Thursday, December 23, 2010

[253] MTSU Closes Dec. 24-Jan. 2 for the Holidays

Release date: Dec. 23, 2010

News & Public Affairs contacts: Randy Weiler, 615-898-5616 or jweiler@mtsu.edu
or Tom Tozer, 615-898-2919 or ttozer@mtsu.edu


MTSU Closes Dec. 24-Jan. 2 for the Holidays

(MURFREESBORO) — MTSU will be closed from Christmas Eve (Friday, Dec. 24) until Monday, Jan. 3, 2011, for the holidays, university officials announced.
All campus offices will be closed during this time. The holiday closures will include the James E. Walker Library, James Union Building, Campus Recreation Center and Keathley University Center. Also, no food service will be available.
MTSU offices will be open from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Jan. 3. Campus Rec, KUC and JUB will reopen at 7 a.m. Jan. 3.
MTSU undergraduate, graduate and transfer students and faculty are in the midst of a one-month winter break between semesters. Spring semester classes will begin on Thursday, Jan. 13.

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Media note: For emergencies, media should contact the MTSU Police (Office of Public Safety) by calling 615-898-2424. MTSU Police can relay messages to MTSU News and Public Affairs personnel if necessary.


Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree — the only one in Tennessee — as a model program. Recently, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

For MTSU news and information, go online to mtsunews.com.

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

[250] Local Student Receives Scholarship From The Tennessee Council of Cooperatives

Dec. 21, 2010
Contact: Tom Tozer 615-898-2919


LOCAL STUDENT RECEIVES SCHOLARSHIP FROM THE TENNESSEE COUNCIL OF COOPERATIVES

MURFREESBORO—The Tennessee Council of Cooperatives (TCC) recently awarded a $750 scholarship to Kelsie Graham of Smyrna, Tenn., a sophomore at Middle Tennessee State University and daughter of Darrell and Angela Graham.
Graham is working toward a bachelor’s degree in animal science with a concentration in horse science. After graduation, she plans to attend graduate school and study equine science.
The young scholar is a member of the MTSU Equestrian Team, Stock Horse Team and Collegiate FFA. She has served as the freshman representative on the Agriculture Council and also has conducted undergraduate research for MTSU Scholars Week.
The TCC is a nonprofit organization established to promote the cooperative form of business through education and promotion of all types of cooperatives.
For more information about Tennessee cooperatives, the Tennessee Council of Cooperatives or the TCC scholarship, please visit http://tennesseecouncilofcoops.org/.

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Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. Recently, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[249] MTSU Professor Edits 'State of Blacks In Middle Tennessee'

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Dec. 21, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Gina Logue, 615-898-5081

MTSU PROFESSOR EDITS ‘STATE OF BLACKS IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE’
Urban League Report Includes Essays from Sekou Franklin and Moses Tesi

(MURFREESBORO) – “The State of Blacks in Middle Tennessee,” a new comprehensive report by scholars and other experts, finds that life for African-Americans in the region is still separate and unequal in 2010.
Published by The Urban League of Middle Tennessee this month in partnership with the Urban EpiCenter and the Center for Community Change, the report breaks its assessments into the categories of community and faith; children, youth and education; economic recovery, jobs and housing; politics, voting and citizenship; race, environment and health; and higher education and university-community relations.
“The taxonomy of contemporary racism (overt racism, institutional racism, racial disparity, racial polarization, racial steering, the black-white achievement gap) is as pervasive in the 21st century as it was in the 1960s,” writes the report’s editor, Dr. Sekou Franklin, associate professor of political science at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, in the preface.
However, Franklin also writes, “Despite this phenomenon, those reading this report will be encouraged by the authors’ varied recommendations for addressing the crises affecting blacks in Middle Tennessee.”
In addition to editing the publication, Franklin authored two articles, “Driving Toward Poverty: African Immigrant Taxi Cab Drivers in the Athens of the South” and “Racially Polarized Voting in Nashville’s 2007 Mayoral Election.” His colleague, Dr. Moses Tesi, an MTSU political science professor, authored “Africans in Middle Tennessee.”
“I think it offers a great perspective from not only academics but people directly affected,” says Patricia Parrish Stokes, President and CEO of the Urban League of Middle Tennessee. “I invite everyone to take the time to review the report and comment. We want this to lead to a meaningful dialogue not only about the issues but about the strategies to deal with the issues. That is our hope moving forward.”
Each section includes a “Letter to Nashville,” an essay about race and the quality of life in Middle Tennessee. There is also a section titled “A Different Look,” which examines race and socioeconomic conditions in Nashville.

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BLACKS
Add 1

Topics featured in “The State of Blacks in Middle Tennessee” include the black church, African-American Muslims, residential segregation, blacks in Clarksville, the black middle class and the Geier consent decree to desegregate higher education.
For more information, contact the Urban League of Middle Tennessee at 615-254-0525, or download the full report at http://www.ulmt.org.

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Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[248] MTSU Professor Looks Forward to WWII Learning Experience

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Dec. 21, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Gina Logue, 615-898-5081, or WMOT-FM, 615-898-2800

MTSU PROFESSOR LOOKS FORWARD TO WWII LEARNING EXPERIENCE
Students to Visit Normandy, Dachau, and Other Compelling European Sites
(MURFREESBORO) – Dr. Derek Frisby, assistant professor of history at MTSU, will talk about his upcoming study-abroad trip to some of the pivotal sites of World War II;s European Theater of Operations on the next edition of “MTSU on the Record” with host Gina Logue at 8 a.m. this Sunday, Dec. 26, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and wmot.org).
From May 19-June 23, 2011, Frisby and the students in his “Warfare and Public Memory in Europe” class will tour Normandy, Bastogne, Dachau and the “Eagle’s Nest,” Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler’s retreat in the mountains above Berchtesgarden.
Students also will follow the route of the 101st Airborne Division’s “Band of Brothers.” Tours of Omaha and Utah beaches, Arnhem and the “Battle of the Bulge” site are on the itinerary, as well as the Bayeux Tapestry, Paris, Verdun, Waterloo and Operation Market Garden, a campaign fought in Germany and the Netherlands.
To listen to previous programs, go to http://www.mtsu.edu/news/podcast/podcast2010.shtml. For more information about “MTSU on the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.
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Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

Monday, December 20, 2010

[247] Fentress County Farm Joins Ranks of State's Century Farms Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Dec. 17, 2010
CONTACT: Caneta Hankins, Center for Historic Preservation, 615-898-2947


FENTRESS COUNTY FARM JOINS RANKS OF STATE’S
CENTURY FARMS PROGRAM

Will Huff Farm Recognized for Agricultural Contributions

(MURFREESBORO)—The Will Huff Farm, located in Fentress County, has been designated as a Tennessee Century Farm, reports Caneta S. Hankins, director of the Century Farms Program at the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University.
The Century Farms Program recognizes the contributions of Tennessee residents who have owned and kept family land in production continuously for at least 100 years.
One hundred years ago, in September of 1910, William “Will” Jack Huff purchased 110 acres for $500 in Fentress County near the Wolf River. During the next 17 years, he expanded his farm to 1,700 acres on which he raised corn, hay, pumpkins, timber and livestock. He and his wife, Gertie Patton had nine children: Emma, Fonza, Willie Jo, Mintis, Printis, Walter, Dentis, Dugan and Ampy. Will donated land where he and Gertie and other members of his family are buried.
In 1930, Dentis Huff acquired 100 acres of the family farm, where he raised hay, corn, hogs, cattle and mules. This tract of land, where his parents’ home was situated, was locally referred to as the “Old Will Huff Farm.” He and his wife, Ina Williams Huff, were the parents of Beecher, Eugene, Billy K., Johnnie, Bernice, Joan, Virginia and Margaret. Dentis and his brothers operated a barite mine from the late 1930s until the early 1950s. The mine was located on the farm and employed several neighbors.
One year before her father’s death in 1975, daughter Margaret acquired the farm. She and her husband, Gary W. Wood, raise hay, corn, tobacco and livestock. Margaret and Gary live on the farm, along with one Blue Heeler dog named “Pepper,” and manage the everyday work. Several buildings, including the barn, hog house, tool shed, smokehouse with cellar underneath and the house continue to be used for the farm’s operations.
The Will Huff Farm is the ninth Century Farm to be certified in Fentress County.
Since 1984, the Center for Historic Preservation at MTSU has been a leader in the important work of documenting Tennessee’s agricultural heritage and history through the Tennessee Century Farms Program. For more information about the Century Farms Program, please visit www.tncenturyfarms.org.The Center for Historic Preservation also may be contacted at Box 80, MTSU, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 37132 or 615-898-2947.

• ATTENTION, MEDIA: To interview the farm’s owner or request jpegs of the farm for editorial use, please contact the CHP at 615-898-2947.




Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. MTSU recently unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

Friday, December 17, 2010

[246] 250 Faculty and Staff Members Awarded for Years of Service at MTSU Annual Service Award Luncheon

Dec. 16, 2010
Contact: Tom Tozer, 615-898-2919


MURFREESBORO — Approximately 250 faculty and staff members at Middle Tennessee State University were recognized for their years of service at the annual Service Award Luncheon Wednesday, Dec. 15, in the James Union Building.
Among the honorees, two individuals were applauded for 45 years of service to MTSU. They were Dr. Dwight Bullard, associate dean in the Jones College of Business, and Betty R. Smithson, administrative assistant in Student Affairs.
Drs. Robert B. Jones (ret., history) and George E. Kerrick (English) were recognized for 40 years of service.
The following MTSU employees were recognized for 35 years of service: C. Nathan Adams (ret.) and R. Wayne Gober (computer information systems), Gail B. Fedak and Carolyn B. Verge (instructional media resources), Barbara Ann Sensing ( financial aid), and Grady Larry Sizemore (grounds services).
Those receiving awards for 30-plus years of service included: Dr. Ronald H. Aday (Sociology and Anthropology), Dr. David P. Badger (Journalism), Dr. Larry Edward Farmer (ret., accounting), Dr. Bichaka Fayissa (economics and finance), Dr. Gordon Lipscomb Freeman (computer information systems), Virginia Lynn McKnight (biology ), Sherrie K. Murray (Murphy Center operations), Frank Randall O'Brien (ret., WMOT Radio), Betty C. Owen (Phillips Bookstore), Dr. Dennis D. Powell (criminal justice administration) Timothy Lee Redd (Farm Laboratory), Dr. Wayne C. Rosing (biology), and Michael D. Sniderman (speech and theatre).

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Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. MTSU recently unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

Thursday, December 16, 2010

[245] MTSU Museum Makes 'Monstrous' Acquisition This Week

Dec. 16, 2010
Contact: Tom Tozer, 615-898-2919

MTSU MUSEUM MAKES ‘MONSTROUS’ ACQUISITION THIS WEEK

MURFREESBORO—Did you know that Middle Tennessee State University has a Mineral, Gem and Fossil Museum on campus? Did you know that the museum is celebrating its 5th anniversary? And did you know the museum has a new mascot … well, really a monstrous new teaching aide?
It’s called an allosaurus, a dinosaur that lived 155 to 145 million years ago during the late Jurassic period. The model stands six feet tall and is 10 feet long. In the prehistoric world, the allosaurus was a large bipedal predator with a large skull and dozens of sharp teeth. It averaged 28 feet in length, but some reached nearly 40 feet.
Dr. Albert Ogden, professor of geosciences and curator of the museum, recently purchased the allosaurus to use as a teaching tool for MTSU students and visiting school groups. Ogden says that hundreds of elementary- and middle-school classes tour the museum every year, and recently the facility surpassed the mark of 9,500 visitors. The facility also has served as a valuable resource for Boy Scouts working to earn their merit badge in geology, he said.
“When Albert started the museum, he had some spectacular mineral displays, and I’m more of a fossil guy,” said Alan Brown, geosciences instructor and museum director. “I’ve been trying to add more fossils. We have some dinosaur eggs, some real dinosaur bones, and just recently we added a cast of a woolly rhino skull.”
Brown said a dinosaur dig in which he participated this past summer unearthed more bones. He is prepping them and will eventually add them to the museum collection.
“The sky’s the limit,” Brown added. “We have the potential to add much more—we’re just running out of room.”
Established in 2005, the museum serves as an experiential lab for earth science classes and a learning center for the general public. It has two main exhibit rooms and a smaller black-light room that displays fluorescent minerals. Samples come from every state in the union and from more than 50 countries around the world.
The museum is located in Room 122 of Ezell Hall, which is located in the southeast corner of the MTSU campus. It is open on Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m., and free visits can be arranged during the week by calling 615-898-5075 or e-mailing adbrown@mtsu.edu. For more information, go to http://sites.google.com/site/mtsumineralmuseum/home.

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Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. MTSU recently unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[244] 'MTSU On The Record' Nears Christmas With Look At Jesus

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Dec. 16, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Gina Logue, 615-898-5081, or WMOT-FM, 615-898-2800

‘MTSU ON THE RECORD’ NEARS CHRISTMAS WITH LOOK AT JESUS
Historian Ron Messier Examines Christian, Islamic Views of Jesus of Nazareth
(MURFREESBORO) – Dr. Ron Messier, professor emeritus of history at MTSU, will talk about his new book Jesus: One Man, Two Faiths on the next edition of “MTSU on the Record” with host Gina Logue at 8 a.m. this Sunday, Dec. 19, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and wmot.org).
Messier, a professor of Middle East history and historical archaeology at MTSU from 1972 to 2004, spent eight years writing this book, which is subtitled “A Dialogue between Christians and Muslims.” Jesus: One Man, Two Faiths compares and contrasts Biblical and Quranical perspectives on Jesus’ birth, crucifixion, resurrection and impact on humanity.
To listen to previous programs, go to http://www.mtsu.edu/news/podcast/podcast2010.shtml. For more information about “MTSU on the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.
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Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[243] Womack Reappointed To Regional Education Board

Dec. 15, 2010
Contact: Tom Tozer, 615-898-2919


WOMACK REAPPOINTED TO REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD

MURFREESBORO—Andy Womack (MTSU’70), agent with State Farm Insurance Company and former state senator, has been reappointed to the Executive Committee of the Southern Regional Education Board.
The SREB works to help guide improvement in public education across the region. The committee assumes a leadership role of the 80-member board, makes budget recommendations and exercises decision-making powers on behalf of the board.
Womack served in the State Senate for 12 years from 1988 to 2000. He was a member of the Senate Education Committee and chaired the body during his final four years. He joined the SREB in 1993, was reappointed in 2000 and has served on the board throughout this decade.
Members of the Womack family have been avid supporters of Middle Tennessee State University for many years—to the point that their name is synonymous with the growth and development of the university throughout the decades. Last year, the Department of Educational Leadership in the College of Education was renamed the Womack Family Educational Leadership Department.

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Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. Recently, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

[242] Sullivan County Farm Joins Ranks of State's Century Farms Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 15, 2010
CONTACT: Caneta Hankins, Center for Historic Preservation, 615-898-2947

SULLIVAN COUNTY FARM JOINS RANKS OF STATE’S CENTURY FARMS PROGRAM

King Farm Recognized for Agricultural Contributions Since Before Statehood

(MURFREESBORO)— The King Farm, located in Sullivan County, has been designated as a Tennessee Pioneer Century Farm, reports Caneta S. Hankins, director of the Century Farms Program at the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University.
The Century Farms Program recognizes the contributions of Tennessee residents who have owned and kept family land in production continuously for at least 100 years. Pioneer Century Farms were established before Tennessee became a state in 1796.
Located four miles west of Piney Flats is the King Farm, founded in 1782 by Edward King (1720-1790), who was issued a land grant of 640 acres in what was then Washington County, N. C. A veteran of the Revolutionary War, King is listed in Captain van Braam’s Company in William Armstrong Crozier’s Virginia Militia. He was awarded 100 acres of land for services at the Battle of the Meadows and Fort Necessity, Penn., where George Washington was placed in his first command.
Married to Elizabeth Nichols (1728-1808), the couple had one son, John King, who was born in 1758. Edward and Elizabeth were charter members of First Presbyterian Church, organized in Sullivan County by the Rev. Samuel Doak in 1782.
After his father’s death, John King acquired the farm. Married twice (to Mary McKinley and Sarah White), he fathered 10 children. Hay, corn, wheat, cattle and horses were among the farm products. According to the family, “John was a leading citizen of the Fork Settlement and was an important factor in establishing civilization and Christianity in this beautiful county.” John and his wives are buried at New Bethel Cemetery. His Bible, dated 1803, remains in the family.
Isaac King came into possession of the farm after his father’s death. Married to Susan Dyer, this couple had seven children. One son, Edward Rutledge King (1843 -1923), was the fourth-generation owner. It was during his years of managing the farm that the Civil War occurred. The family has a corn “sheller” that was owned by Edward, who was in charge of shelling and loading a barge at Allison’s Mill for the river journey to Knoxville.
The family also owns other pieces from previous generations, including a log wagon used by fifth-generation owner Roy A. King, who cut and hauled timber. Roy also was a breeder of draft horses and mules. He would ride a stallion and lead a “jack” to breed mares at farms in the area. He was married to Mary Snapp, and the couple had eight children. Their son, Edward Lynn King, acquired the family farm in 1942. Like his father, E. Lynn was a draft-horse breeder for many years. The family recalls that he sold straw to TVA for “grass seeding around the dams in the early 1950s.” A progressive farmer, King was named the Conservation Farmer of the Year in 1982. Grains, tobacco, beef and dairy cattle, hogs and horses were raised on the farm. Stephen Edward and Teresa Lynn were born to E. Lynn King and his wife, Georgia M. Byrd King.
Stephen is the seventh generation of the King family to own this historic farm. He and his wife, Teresa Ann Whitson, and their children, Jonathan and Lauren, along with his mother, Georgia, live on the farm. On 200 acres, the Kings have a diverse operation, which includes beef and dairy cattle and Tennessee walking horses, along with tobacco, hay and grains. A brick house, dated 1879, and barns and outbuildings dating from the late 19th and early 20th centuries are part of the landscape. Drawing on the experience of his ancestors and a genuine love of the land, Stephen has received many awards, including Outstanding Young Farmer in 1986, the Tennessee Farm Bureau’s Young Farmer of the Year in 1986 and Conservation Farmer of the Year in Sullivan County in 1996. In 2010, the Kings received the “Excellence in Agriculture and Forestry Award,” one of the Governor’s Environmental Stewardship Awards. At a time when most dairy farms have ceased production in Tennessee, the King Farm milks 180 cows and produces an average of 20,000 pounds of milk per cow each year. They raise most of the feed for the herd, and farm wastes are used as fertilizer and delivered to croplands through a 2,600-foot pipeline-irrigation system.
For 228 years, the King family has contributed to the history, culture and economy of Sullivan County and Tennessee. Their history on this farm and the stories of the generations illustrate the work ethic, skill and resourcefulness of the state’s farm families.
Since 1984, the Center for Historic Preservation at MTSU has been a leader in the important work of documenting Tennessee’s agricultural heritage and history through the Tennessee Century Farms Program. For more information about the Century Farms Program, please visit www.tncenturyfarms.org. The Center for Historic Preservation also may be contacted at Box 80, MTSU, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 37132 or 615-898-2947.

• ATTENTION, MEDIA: To interview the farm’s owner or request jpegs of the farm for editorial use, please contact the CHP at 615-898-2947.




Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. Recently, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

Monday, December 13, 2010

[241] Washington County Farm Joins Ranks of State's Century Farms Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 13, 2010
CONTACT: Caneta Hankins, Center for Historic Preservation, 615-898-2947


WASHINGTON COUNTY FARM JOINS RANKS OF STATE’S CENTURY FARMS PROGRAM

Beech Grove Farm Recognized for Agricultural Contributions Before Statehood

(MURFREESBORO)—Beech Grove Farm, located in Washington County, has been designated as a Tennessee Pioneer Century Farm, reports Caneta S. Hankins, director of the Century Farms Program at the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University.
The Century Farms Program recognizes the contributions of Tennessee residents who have owned and kept family land in production continuously for least 100 years. Pioneer Century Farms were established before Tennessee became a state in 1796.
Shadrack Hale founded a farm of at least 1,000 acres from land grants and purchases dating as far back as 1778. He and his wife, Mary, had four children: three sons and a daughter. According to the family, Shadrack and his brothers Meshack, Abednego and Nicholas, with their brother-in-law Rev. Matthew Talbot, moved into this area of what was then North Carolina. The family witnessed many important events in Tennessee history.
“The oldest deed in the records of Tennessee was witnessed by one of these brothers,” family members said. “Shadrack Hale signed the petition requesting that North Carolina approve the new State of Franklin.”
Shadrack Hale Jr. became the owner of the farm in 1803. He acquired at least 100 acres from his father and also signed the petition for the creation of the State of Franklin. While his wife’s name is unknown, he had one son, Landon Carter Hale, who eventually inherited the family farm. Landon Hale was married to Hannah Ellis, and the couple had 11 children.
James Ellis Hale, born in 1836, received land after Landon passed away in 1893. Married twice, James had one son, William Brewer Hale, with his first wife, Delcina Chase, and five children with his second wife, Nancy Anne Ferguson. The Hales raised hogs, cattle, horses, mules, chickens, corn, wheat, tobacco and fruit. James Ellis served as a magistrate for his district, and Nancy Anne was one of the five charter members of the Oak Hill Baptist Church, which still is active. It was during this generation that the Civil War occurred, and Nancy’s brother fought for the Confederacy.
After her father’s death in 1897, Mary Tennessee Hale Odell, (or Molly as she also was called), and her husband, Albert Monroe Odell, received approximately 80 acres. They continued to raise many of the same crops as her parents with the addition of turkeys. The couple had lived with his parents in Virginia before receiving the land, so Albert built a new home between 1897 and 1900 in Tennessee, where two of their five children were born. He also built a large barn, crib, sheds, chicken house, carriage house and a house to rent. While serving on the building committee for the Oak Hill Baptist Church, he built the pews and pulpit. He also worked on many other buildings in his community.
When Molly died in 1944, the land was divided among her children. Eugene Hale Odell bought his siblings’ shares. He and wife, Ava Rowena Watkins Odell, also bought two other tracts of land once belonging to Shadrack Hale. They owned approximately 160 acres. The couple had two children, Richard Gene and Anna May, and raised tobacco, corn, wheat, barley, hay, fruit, beef and dairy cattle, chickens and horses. Very active in their community, both were members of the Oak Hill Baptist Church, where Eugene served as a deacon and Rowena taught Sunday school, organized the first Bible school and served on numerous committees. Rowena also was in the Home Demonstration Club.
In 2004, Richard and Anna inherited the farm. Richard and his wife, Joanne Chambers Odell, had three children: Joanna, Richard Patrick and Laurel Leigh. Anna May and her husband, John Edward Mays, had two daughters, Anita Anne Newsom and Cynthia Anne Clark. Richard and Anna rented the land to Carl Cox who raised corn, hay and dairy cattle.
Today, Anna Mays owns 25 acres on which she raises Angus cattle, horses and hay. Her daughter and son-in-law, Anita and Mike Newsom, also work and live on the land. There are several older buildings on the farm, including the original house, tobacco barn, feeding shed and a smoke house. The Mays and Newsoms were honored at the Farmland Legacy Conference held at Pigeon Forge on Nov. 12. Beech Grove Farm is the 24th Century Farm to be certified in Washington County and the 49th Pioneer Farm to be certified in the state.
Since 1984, the Center for Historic Preservation at MTSU has been a leader in the important work of documenting Tennessee’s agricultural heritage and history through the Tennessee Century Farm Program.
For more information about the Century Farms Program, please visit www.tncenturyfarms.org.The Center for Historic Preservation also may be contacted at Box 80, MTSU, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 37132 or 615-898-2947.

• ATTENTION, MEDIA: To interview the farm’s owner or request jpegs of the farm for editorial use, please contact the CHP at 615-898-2947.




Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. Recently, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[240] Marion County Farm Joins Ranks of State's Century Farms Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 13, 2010
CONTACT Info: Caneta Hankins, Center for Historic Preservation, 615-898-2947

MARION COUNTY FARM JOINS RANKS OF STATE’S CENTURY FARMS PROGRAM

Roberts Ranch Recognized for Agricultural Contributions

(MURFREESBORO)— Roberts Ranch, located in Marion County, has been designated as a Tennessee Century Farm, reports Caneta S. Hankins, director of the Century Farms Program at the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University.
The Century Farms Program recognizes the contributions of Tennessee residents who have owned and kept family land in production continuously for at least 100 years.
Marion County was established in 1817 and named after the Revolutionary War hero, Brig. Gen. Francis Marion of South Carolina, who also was known as the “Swamp Fox.” The Sequatchie Valley is home to many productive and beautiful farms, and Marion County currently has five certified Century Farms. The most recent application comes from the family of William C. Shirley, who founded a farm just west of the Sequatchie River in 1886. He and his wife, Semiramis Andes, primarily raised corn and cows on their farm. The couple had no children so the farm passed to their nephew, James Albert Roberts, who was married to their niece, Sarah Elizabeth Shirley Roberts. The Roberts were the parents of six children. Thirty years passed, and Buell Oscar Roberts acquired the land from his parents. He and his wife Hattie White had 10 children.
The current owners of the farm are Randy and Kim Dreller Roberts. They are the parents of Austin and Lauren, raise cattle and hay and have a large vegetable garden. Barns, a corn crib and the fertile fields of the valley are a part of the heritage of Roberts Ranch.
Since 1984, the Center for Historic Preservation at MTSU has been a leader in the important work of documenting Tennessee’s agricultural heritage and history through the Tennessee Century Farms Program. For more information about the Century Farms Program, please visit www.tncenturyfarms.org.The Center for Historic Preservation also may be contacted at Box 80, MTSU, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 37132 or 615-898-2947.

• ATTENTION, MEDIA: To interview the farm’s owner or request jpegs of the farm for editorial use, please contact the CHP at 615-898-2947.




Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[239] World War II Flyer Honored With A Return To The Air Today

Dec. 10, 2010
CONTACT: Tom Tozer, 615-898-2919

WORLD WAR II FLYER HONORED WITH A RETURN TO THE AIR TODAY

MURFREESBORO—It was a privilege to be there and see it. The pleasure was all John Ford’s.
Whether it was to cross off an item on a “bucket list” or to relive an indelible memory, when World War II fighter pilot John Ford, 89, took off from the Murfreesboro Airport today at noon in a 1952 de Havilland Beaver aircraft, he made a return trip to his youth and those glory days of flying across Africa and Europe.
Ford, a resident of the Tennessee State Veterans Home in Murfreesboro wanted one more opportunity to fly. Ford was a highly decorated World War II pilot who flew B-26 bombers and was the recipient of 19 air medals from the U.S. Army Air Corps. A member of the Army’s Ninth Air Force, he flew 24 hours nonstop on D-Day, June 6, 1944, in support of his mission.
People who know Ford and admire his service to his country decided to make Ford’s wish come true.
Dr. Tony Johnston, MTSU professor of agribusiness and agriscience and a member of the 118th Airlift Wing of the Tennessee National Guard, got the ball rolling. Johnston’s mother resides at the TSVH, and they both know Ford well.
“To veterans, heroes are the men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice,” Johnston said. “Mr. Ford is a hero to many of us because of his significant sacrifices and service during World War II. Today we are honored to have the opportunity to thank him for his service and challenged to remember that the world would be completely different today had he not been one of the many who fought and died for the principals we Americans hold so dear.”
When Barbara Cochran, TSVH activities director, learned of Ford’s desire to fly again, she and Johnston collaborated. Johnston then contacted MTSU’s aerospace department, which furnished both the plane and the pilot.
Terry Dorris, MTSU associate professor of aerospace, piloted the de Havilland Beaver and, along with Johnston and Gina Logue, MTSU News and Public Affairs, were the only people who may have caught a smile on the old soldier’s face as they soared through the air.

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Friday, December 10, 2010

[238] TECTA Offering Training In Early-Childhood Education

TECTA OFFERING TRAINING IN EARLY-CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
Registration for Free Spring Orientation Courses Under Way Now

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Dec. 10, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Denise Perkins, 615-898-2974

(MURFREESBORO)—Free orientation courses for people working in monitored early-childhood education programs, offered by the Tennessee Early Childhood Training Alliance, are getting under way for spring and summer at MTSU.
TECTA orientation is the gateway to eligibility for financial assistance for college course work leading to a degree in early-childhood education or related fields is recognized by the Tennessee Department of Human Services as a way to satisfy annual training-hour requirements.
Participants must complete the 30 hours to receive a TECTA Orientation Certificate.
Students who complete the 30 clock hours and continue to work with young children become eligible for tuition assistance for academic coursework leading to a degree in early-childhood education at various levels—associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral.
There are five types of orientation programs: school-age, infant/toddler, family, center-based and administrative. The MTSU TECTA site is part of a statewide grant and serves Rutherford and 16 other counties in the south central area of Tennessee.
The TECTA Family Child Care Orientation course in Rutherford County includes information on caring for up to 15 children six weeks to 3 years old. Sessions begin on Saturday, March 26, from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and follow on April 2, May 14, June 4 and June 11. The registration deadline is Tuesday, March 1.
The TECTA Center-Based Orientation course in Rutherford County, which emphasizes work with children ages 2 1/2 to 5, will meet on Thursday nights from 6 to 9 beginning on April 14. Subsequent sessions are set for April 21 and 28; May 5, 12 and 26; and June 2, 9, 16 and 23. That registration deadline also is March 1.
The 10-week TECTA Administrator Orientation in Rutherford County will meet every Tuesday beginning Jan. 25. The focus of this orientation program is on how to run an early-childhood program, managing staff, etc., and the registration deadline is Thursday, Jan. 6.
TECTA is funded through a contract with the DHS and Tennessee State University’s Center of Excellence for Learning Sciences.
For more information about these courses or to register for them, call 615-904-8318 or visit the MTSU TECTA website at www.mtsu.edu/~tecta.

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. MTSU also recently unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

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IN BRIEF: Free orientation courses for people working in monitored early-childhood education programs, offered by the Tennessee Early Childhood Training Alliance, are getting under way for spring and summer at MTSU. The TECTA Family Child Care Orientation and the Center-Based Orientation courses in Rutherford County have a registration deadline of Tuesday, March 1. And the 10-week TECTA Administrator Orientation in Rutherford County course has a registration deadline of Thursday, Jan. 6. For more information about these courses or to register for them, call 615-904-8318 or visit the MTSU TECTA website at www.mtsu.edu/~tecta.

For MTSU news and information, visit www.mtsunews.com.

—30—

[237] Alumnus Ethridge to Speak Dec. 17 as Six MTSU ROTC Cadets Will Be Comissioned in Ceremony

Release date: Dec. 9, 2010

News & Public Affairs contact: Randy Weiler, 615-898-5616 or jweiler@mtsu.edu
Military Science contact: Lt. Col. T.K. Kast, 615-898-2470 or tkast@mtsu.edu

Alumnus Ethridge to Speak Dec. 17 as Six MTSU
ROTC Cadets Will Be Commissioned in Ceremony

(MURFREESBORO) — Col. Terry A. Ethridge, chief of staff for the Tennessee Army National Guard and an MTSU alumnus, will be the guest speaker for the Friday, Dec. 17, military science department’s fall commissioning ceremony.
The formal ceremony, which will begin at 10 a.m., will be held in Tucker Theater in Keathley University Center. It is open to the general public, MTSU community and family and friends of the six student cadets who also are degree candidates expected to graduate Saturday, Dec. 18, in Murphy Center.
In his position, Ethridge reports directly to the assistant adjutant general for Army matters and assists in the external affairs functions, including presenting and enforcing Army National Guard policies, plans and programs.
Ethridge, who is a Murfreesboro resident, presides over the Army National Guard staff and represents Army capabilities, requirements, policy, plans and programs in joint operations. Under the authority of the Army’s assistant adjutant general, the chief of staff also designates army personnel and army resources.
Before this assignment, Ethridge served as the deputy chief of staff for aviation and state aviation officer. In this position, he was responsible for the overall administration, supervision and training of 14 Army Aviation units statewide. The units included the UH-60 Blackhawk, the AH-64 Apache and the OH-58D Kiowa Warrior.
Ethridge was commissioned field artillery from MTSU’s ROTC program in 1978. He is a graduate of the U.S. Army Airborne School, and the Field Artillery Officer Basic and Cannon Battery Officer Courses.
Professor of military science Lt. Col. T.K. Kast will preside over the ceremony.
The fall semester commissionees include:
• 2nd Lt. Amanda Morgan, who is a business-administration major from Clarksville, Tenn. She will be commissioned reserve forces duty, Army National Guard. Morgan will be branched aviation and her National Guard unit will be Troop D, 1-230th ACS in Smyrna. She is the daughter of Lt. Col. Patrick and Beth Morgan of Clarksville;
• 2nd Lt. Nicholas Chapin, who is business-finance major from Williamsport, Tenn. He will be commissioned reserve forces duty, infantry branch, Army National Guard. He is the son of Paul and Kathleen Chapin of Williamsport;
• 2nd Lt. Jonathan Henry, who is an exercise-science major from Murfreesboro and formerly from Mounds, Ill. He will be commissioned active duty, aviation branch. He is married to Elizabeth Henry, and son of Brenda Moreland of Mounds and Paul Henry of Ocala, Fla.;
• 2nd Lt. Brandon Moore, who is a business-administration major from Smyrna. He will be commissioned reserve forces duty, Army National Guard. He will be branched quartermaster corps and his National Guard unit will be Detachment 1, Troop G, 278th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Shelbyville. He is the son of Scott and Leslie Moore of Smyrna;
• 2nd Lt. Kenneth Smith, who is a political-science major from Murfreesboro. He will be commissioned reserve forces duty, Army Reserve. He will be branched transportation corps and his reserve unit will be 640th Army Support Group in Nashville. He is the son of Charles and Shirley Smith of Murfreesboro; and
• 2nd Lt. David Hubert, who is a liberal-studies major from Murrells Inlet, S.C. He will be commissioned active duty, Armor Branch. His basic officer leadership course assignment will be Fort Knox, Ky. He is the son of Rick Hubert of Murrells Inlet.

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Media welcomed.

Media note: A high-resolution jpeg photo of Col. Terry Ethridge is available. To obtain, please contact MTSU News & Public Affairs by calling 615-898-2919.

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree — the only one in Tennessee — as a model program. Recently, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

For MTSU news and information, go online to mtsunews.com.

[236] Working Women In Magazines Topic Of 'MTSU On The Record'

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Dec. 9, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Gina Logue, 615-898-5081, or WMOT-FM, 615-898-2800

WORKING WOMEN IN MAGAZINES TOPIC OF ‘MTSU ON THE RECORD’
Stereotyping and Marginalization between the Pages and between the World Wars
(MURFREESBORO) – The depiction of working women in magazines issued in the period between the end of World War I and World War II is the subject to be discussed on the next edition of “MTSU on the Record” with host Gina Logue at 8 a.m. this Sunday, Dec. 12, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and wmot.org).
Dr. Jane Marcellus, associate professor of journalism at MTSU, is the author of Business Girls & Two-Job Wives: Emerging Media Stereotypes of Employed Women (Hampton Press), which examines the ways both articles and advertisements pigeonholed women who worked outside the home. The magazines Marcellus studied include not only those which targeted women—such as McCall’s and Ladies’ Home Journal—but also Forbes, Collier’s, Life, Time and U.S. News and World Report, among others.
To listen to previous programs, go to http://www.mtsu.edu/news/podcast/podcast2010.shtml. For more information about “MTSU on the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.
--30--

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. Recently, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

[234] Hickman County Farm Joins Ranks of State's Century Farms Program

HICKMAN COUNTY FARM JOINS RANKS OF STATE’S CENTURY FARMS PROGRAM

Neeley Farm Recognized for Agricultural Contributions

(MURFREESBORO)—The Neeley Farm, located in Hickman County, has been designated as a Tennessee Century Farm, reports Caneta S. Hankins, director of the Century Farms Program at the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University.
The Century Farm Program recognizes the contributions of Tennessee residents who have owned and kept family land in production continuously for at least 100 years.
Founded by David Melton Duncan in 1861, the Neeley Farm sits along the Big Swan River. This 105-acre farm combined two tracts of land, the first 85 acres from John Sharp on Jan. 31, 1861, and 30 acres from J. A. Hines and wife on Jan. 25, 1883. On his land, Duncan raised corn, hay, peanuts, hogs, mules, cattle, timber and a garden. He and his wife, Mary Ann Whiteside, married in 1854 and had 11 children. According to the family, during the Civil War “Yankee soldiers camped up and down Swan Creek, and the Duncans protected their money by hiding it in the clock.”
After David and Mary’s death, the land was divided among their children. Through the years, D. C. “Tobe” Duncan purchased most of the farm. He and his siblings, J. W., George and Kesiah, raised broom corn, made brooms using an iron broom maker and sold them in town and to their neighbors. The three siblings never married and lived together on the farm until their deaths. Married to Jeannie Smith, D. C. had four children. After her death, D. C. married Tabitha George and had two more children.
The land went to auction after the death of D. C. Duncan. It was purchased by Cooper Duncan, D. C.’s oldest son. According to the family, Cooper’s wife did not want to live on the farm, so he sold it to his sister’s husband, Henry Stanley Neeley, in November 1927. He and his wife Claudia Duncan Neeley, had 10 children, seven of whom survived to adulthood. Just two years later, the stock market crashed leading to the Great Depression. According to the family, “times were hard.” Having a large family to support, the Neeleys canned their own food, churned butter, sold eggs, raised and slaughtered their cows and hogs, made lye soap and sheared sheep for the wool. The main crops on the farm were corn, wheat, hay, sorghum cane, tobacco, chickens, eggs and a garden. After Stanley’s death in 1958, Claudia gained control of the farm. In 1985, she transferred the deed to her children, Ed Neeley, Annie Brown Farais, Dee Cee Neeley, Bernice Proffitt and Mai Katherine Neeley.
The great-great-grandson of D. M. Duncan, Dee Cee, purchased the land from his siblings in 1997. Aside from the family farm, he also owns another 210 acres, 160 of which are used for farming. He currently raises horses, cattle and hay for feed. The land is also used for deer and turkey hunting and is known for its spring, which flows year-round. Dee Cee, 83, continues to manage the daily operations of the farm. He tends the pastures, keeps the hay cut and maintains the fences and buildings. The property has been placed in the Neeley Family Trust, meaning the farm will go to Dee Cee’s children, Pam Tenpenny and Ricky Neeley, and then to their children after their deaths.“He has a lifetime estate and recognized the importance of passing the farm on to family,” family members said.
The Neeley Farm is the 18th Century Farm to be certified in Hickman County.
Since 1984, the Center for Historic Preservation at MTSU has been a leader in the important work of documenting Tennessee’s agricultural heritage and history through the Tennessee Century Farms Program. For more information about the Century Farms Program, please visit www.tncenturyfarms.org.The Center for Historic Preservation also may be contacted at Box 80, MTSU, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 37132 or 615-898-2947.

• ATTENTION, MEDIA: To interview the farm’s owner or request jpegs of the farm for editorial use, please contact the CHP at 615-898-2947.




Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[233] MTSU News Release: Story of Historic Bowl Game Highlights New Exhibit

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
MTSU Center for Historic Preservation
Dr. Carroll Van West - Tel: 615-217-8013
Email: cwest@mtsu.edu or heritage@mtsu.edu

Story of Historic Bowl Game Highlights New Exhibit

(Murfreesboro) – A new Heritage Center exhibit, “Communities, Competitions and the University Campus, 1926-2010,” opens on Tuesday, Dec. 14, and explores how MTSU has hosted many important high-school and university athletic competitions enjoyed by hundreds of thousands of Tennesseans.
Several of the exhibit’s stories are well-known, including the many Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association high-school football and basketball championship games and when “Friday Night Lights” in Rutherford County meant football at MTSU’s Jones Field.
Other stories have become obscured by the passing decades. One of the most fascinating is the story of the 1965 Grantland Rice Bowl, a NCAA-sanctioned game that featured what was then Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial (now Tennessee State) University and Ball State University. It was the first time an all-African-American college team had played a white college team in Tennessee.
The NCAA Library and archives lent copies of the game program for the exhibits and Wayne Belt of Murfreesboro dug out what he remembered as a promotional film about the bowl game. Once the film was converted into digital format, however, everyone realized that it depicted all of the highlights of that historic 1965 game-all of the scoring, a bit of the TSU drill team’s halftime show and the game’s dramatic ending, which will remind today’s football fans of the Titans’ Super Bowl game in 2000.
Other exhibit highlights feature future NFL Hall-of-Famer Terry Bradshaw’s appearance in a Grantland Rice Bowl, when Tennessee played Notre Dame at MTSU during the NCAA Tournament, and Earvin “Magic” Johnson’s game at MTSU on his way to the NCAA championship in 1979.
High-school competitions are another exhibit focal point, including the last six-on-six game played in girls’ high school basketball, and the annual Contest of Champions, a nationally recognized competition between marching bands from across the eastern United States.
The exhibit will open at the Heritage Center on Dec. 14, from 3 to 5 p.m. Sara Beth Gideon, an undergraduate University Honors College history major, was the exhibit curator. She worked with Dr. Carroll Van West of the MTSU Center for Historic Preservation and was supported by her Honors College thesis committee, Drs. John Vile and Alfred Lutz.
“Some of these tournaments have a long-standing tradition at MTSU that dates back to the 1920s,” Gideon observed “and it is the combined efforts of the community and the campus that invites these tournaments year after year.”
Gideon’s is the first Honor’s thesis College thesis to be presented as a history exhibit. She said compiling the research and artifacts for her first exhibit “was a daunting task at times, but seeing all my hard work turned into exhibit panels has been one of the proudest moments of my life.”
Located just off the Public Square at 225 W. College Street, The Heritage Center is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding major holidays, and features local history exhibits and guided walking tours of the square on the hour. Group tours are available Monday through Saturday by advance reservations. Admission is free. For more information, please call 615-217-8013.


Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree — the only one in Tennessee — as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[232] MTSU Recording Industry Prof, Alumni Receive Grammy Nominations

Dec. 8, 2010
Contact: Tom Tozer, 615-898-2919


MTSU RECORDING INDUSTRY PROF, ALUMNI RECEIVE GRAMMY NOMINATIONS

MURFREESBORO—The 53rd Annual Grammy Awards will be presented Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011, in Los Angeles, and faculty and alumni from Middle Tennessee State University may well hear their names called as winners of the coveted prize.
John Hill, professor in MTSU’s nationally recognized Department of Recording Industry, received two Grammy nominations for his work as an audio engineer. His contributions earned “Best Engineered Album, Classical” and “Best Classical Album” nominations for Daugherty: Metropolis Symphony; Deus Ex Machina, as performed by Giancarlo Guerrero and the Nashville Symphony Orchestra.
Michael Latterell (MTSU ’03) and this year’s MTSU Young Alumnus Achievement Award honoree, has received another Grammy nomination for engineering to his already impressive list of five nominations. Latterell was the lead engineer on Rhonda Vincent’s “All American Bluegrass Girl,” which has been nominated for two Grammys.
In 2009, Latterell earned a Grammy Award for “Best Bluegrass Album” with singer/songwriter Jim Lauderdale’s “The Bluegrass Diaries.” Latterell is assistant to the regional manager for Music City Audio Machines and also works as an independent producer and engineer.
Clarke Schleicher (MTSU ’80) received two nominations for work as an engineer/mixer on Lady Antebellum’s “Need You Now” produced by Antebellum and Paul Worley for Capitol Records in Nashville. Schleicher helped to snag “Record of the Year” and “Album of the Year” Grammy Award nominations. Schleicher owns and operates L. Clarke Schleicher Engineerin in Nashville.
The Grammy Award ceremony, broadcast live from Staples Center in Los Angeles, will be telecast on CBS Television on Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. Central Time.
Please visit mtsunews.com.


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NOTE: For photos of Hill and Latterell, please e-mail Tom Tozer at ttozer@mtsu.edu.

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[231] Annual Accounting CPE Day Set for Dec. 9 at MTSU

Release date: Dec. 8, 2010

News & Public Affairs contact: Randy Weiler, 615-898-5616 or jweiler@mtsu.edu
Accounting contacts: Pat Wall, 615-898-2039 or pwall@mtsu.edu
or Melanie Nichols, 615-898-5306 or mdnichol@mtsu.edu

Annual Accounting CPE Day Set for Dec. 9 at MTSU

(MURFREESBORO) — The second Department of Accounting Continuing Professional Education Day at MTSU will be held Thursday, Dec. 9, from 7:30 a.m. to 4:50 p.m. in the Business and Aerospace Building’s State Farm Lecture Hall. Seminars during the conference include presentations by Department of Accounting faculty on accounting and financial reporting, auditing, taxation and ethics. Participants can earn up to eight hours of CPE credit. The cost is $150, which includes all seminars, materials and lunch.
 The sessions include:
• “Legality of Accounting Topics,” Dr. Sandy Benson, assistant professor of business law;
• “Ethics,” Dr. E. James Burton, dean of the Jennings A. Jones College of Business;
• “Tennessee Ethics,” Mark Crocker, executive director of the Tennessee Board of Accountancy;
• “Constitutionality of SOX (Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002),“ Dr. Lara Daniel, business-law professor;
• “International Financial Reporting Standards,” Dr. Jeannie Harrington, associate professor of accounting;
• “Accounting for Gift Cards,” Dr. Charlie C. Kile, associate professor of accounting;
• “Additional Issues in Taxation,” Dr. Tim Koski, accounting professor;
• “Audit Update,” Bill Mooningham, a retired partner from Ernst & Young and an accounting instructor;
• “Government Accounting Standards Board Update,“ Dr. G. Robert “Smitty” Smith Jr., interim chair of the Department of Accounting; and
• “Financial Accounting Standards Board Update,” Dr. Paula Thomas, professor of accounting.
To register or get more information, visit the Department of Accounting website at www.mtsu.edu/accounting or call 615-898-5306.

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Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree — the only one in Tennessee — as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

For MTSU news and information, go online to mtsunews.com.

Monday, December 06, 2010

[230] State Farm Insurance Continues to Ensure Excellence in Education with $22k Gift to MTSU

Contact: Tom Tozer, 615-898-2919; Nick Perlick, 615-904-8409


State Farm Insurance continues to ensure excellence in education with $22K gift to MTSU

MURFREESBORO—State Farm Insurance recently presented a check for $22,000 to the MTSU Foundation to continue the company’s support of four outstanding programs that promote student creativity and scholarship and help the university attract and retain the finest business faculty.
Jeff Shay, State Farm vice president of operations, and Leslie Eatherly of the company’s public- affairs office toured the campus and enjoyed lunch with university faculty and administrators.
“It is important to me, as a father and business leader, to support the educational programs at Middle Tennessee State University,” Shay said. “Our longtime commitment to MTSU has proven to be beneficial not only to MTSU students but also students in our local school system. And while our investment may affect the community outside the State Farm facility, it definitely makes an impact inside our own walls, where we employ more than 1,700 people with children who attend local schools and the university.”
The MTSU Science Olympiad Regional Tournament, for which $4,000 of the gift was earmarked, is one of the programs supported by State Farm that involves youngsters throughout the region. Every year since 2001, middle- and high-school students spend a Saturday on campus competing in events that relate to science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
“Since many schools have very tight budgets, it’s great to have a partner that can help bring STEM education to many of their students,” noted Dr. Pat Patterson, associate professor of chemistry and Olympiad director. “The coaches and I are thankful to have State Farm as a partner in middle Tennessee. We have received more than $31,000 from them.”
MTSU Invention Convention received $6,000 of the most recent donation. The first Invention Convention occurred in 1993 and involved 56 students and 42 inventions, Dr. Tracey Ring, professor of elementary and special education and event director, pointed out. Last year’s event attracted more than 300 students and 132 inventions, she said, and has grown so large that it is now held in MTSU’s Murphy Center.
“In addition to the awards given in each of the categories,” Ring said, “an award to honor State Farm’s involvement was created. The State Farm Excellence Award honors projects of excellence and expresses our deep appreciation for their support.”
The discipline of actuarial science trains students to apply mathematical skills and statistical techniques to assess risk in the insurance and finance industries, explained Dr. Don Hong, MTSU professor of mathematical sciences. Hong received $2,000 for the program.
“The State Farm Insurance Scholarship for Excellence in Actuarial Science has been beneficial to many of our students in the program,” Hong said. “We are very proud to report that one of the recent scholarship recipients has achieved Fellow membership status from the Society of Actuaries.”
This fall, six students from China enrolled in the actuarial science program at MTSU, he added. “The program cannot continue to thrive without support from our fine partners like State Farm Insurance.”
Finally, $10,000 of the donation will support the State Farm Award for Professional Promise, providing financial assistance to retain bright, young faculty in MTSU’s Jennings A. Jones College of Business.
“We are indebted to State Farm for their recognition of the fact that by keeping and encouraging the best faculty talent, we are insuring that we will teach and graduate the brightest students who will contribute to the public welfare and common good,” said Dr. E. James Burton, dean of the Jones College.
“State Farm has been a great partner with MTSU for many years,” added Nick Perlick, MTSU director of development. “Their support has made a significant impact on our actuary program and several initiatives targeting students in kindergarten through 12th grades. We are very fortunate to have them in our community and involved with the university.”

[229] 1,750 Expected To Graduate From MTSU During Fall Commencement Dec. 18

Dec. 6, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Office of News and Public Affairs, 615-898-2919


1,750 EXPECTED TO GRADUATE FROM MTSU DURING FALL COMMENCEMENT DEC. 18
Ceremonies Will Be Webcast for Those Unable to Attend

(MURFREESBORO)—A projected 1,750 degree candidates will graduate during the Fall 2010 Commencement ceremonies on Saturday, Dec. 18, at Middle Tennessee State University, officials announced.
Of that total, 1,466 candidates will receive undergraduate degrees, said Ann S. Reaves, assistant director for graduation in the MTSU Records Office. Two hundred eighty-four students will receive graduate degrees including 213 master’s degrees, 12 education-specialist degrees and five Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Two of the Ph.D. degrees will be posthumous awards.
The morning ceremony will begin at 9 a.m. in Murphy Center on the MTSU campus, with J. Stanley Rogers (B.S. ’61), senior partner with the Rogers & Duncan law firm in Manchester, Tenn., delivering the commencement address.
Rogers received his Bachelor of Science degree from MTSU and a Juris Doctor degree from Vanderbilt University. He is admitted to practice law before the U.S. District Court, Eastern, Middle and Western Districts of Tennessee; U.S. Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit; U.S. Claims Court; and the U.S. Supreme Court. He has served as a member of the Lawyers Involved for Tennessee, the Tennessee Appellate Court Nominating Commission, the Tennessee Judicial Evaluation Commission and the U.S. Circuit Judge Nominating Commission, Sixth Circuit.
Rogers served for six years in the Tennessee House of Representatives and was majority leader during the 88th and 89th general assemblies. He recently retired from the Tennessee Board of Regents after serving since 1994. Rogers and his wife, Pat, have three children.
The morning commencement ceremony will honor graduates in the College of Graduate Studies, Jennings A. Jones College of Business, College of Education and College of Mass Communication.
The afternoon ceremony will begin at 1 p.m. in Murphy Center with State Sen. Randy McNally, R-5th District, addressing the graduates.
McNally is a graduate of Oak Ridge High School and received his Bachelor of Science degree from Memphis State University. He attended the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy and held the position of hospital pharmacist from 1978 to 2010 at Methodist Medical Center in Oak Ridge.
McNally has served in both the Senate (95th-106th general assemblies) and House (91st—94th) of the Tennessee Legislature. He has chaired the Finance, Ways and Means Committee and the Education Committee and also assumed leadership roles on the Council on Pensions and Insurance, the Education Oversight Committee, the TennCare Oversight Committee and the Governor’s Methamphetamine Task Force.
The afternoon ceremony will celebrate graduates from the College of Basic and Applied Sciences, College of Behavioral and Health Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and the University College.
Graduation information—including maps and driving directions to Murphy Center, instructions on watching the ceremonies via streaming video on commencement day, cap-and-gown information and how to order a DVD of the ceremonies— is available online at www.mtsunews.com and clicking on the “Graduation Info” link.

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MTSU FALL 2010 COMMENCEMENT AT A GLANCE

Who: 1,750 graduates* (1,466 undergraduates, 284 graduate students)
What: MTSU’s fall commencement ceremony.
When: 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Dec. 18
Where: Murphy Center
Commencement speakers: Morning ceremony, J. Stanley Rogers, senior partner with Rogers and Duncan Law Firm; 1 p.m. ceremony, State Sen. Randy McNally.

* — approximate number as of Dec. 6, 2010.

•ATTENTION, MEDIA: To request jpegs of J. Stanley Rogers or Randy McNally, please call the Office of News and Public Affairs at MTSU at 615-898-2919.

----------------

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.


For MTSU news and information, visit www.mtsunews.com.

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Friday, December 03, 2010

[228] MTSU Student-Grown Poinsettias Are For Sale

Release date: Dec. 2, 2010

News & Public Affairs contact: Randy Weiler, 615-898-5616 or jweiler@mtsu.edu
School of Agriscience contact: Dr. Nate Phillips, 615-494-8985
or nphillip@mtsu.edu

MTSU Student-Grown Poinsettias Are for Sale

(MURFREESBORO) — The MTSU Plant and Soil Science Club’s annual poinsettia sale is under way, said club adviser Dr. Nate Phillips, assistant professor in the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience.
Open to the public and the MTSU community, the sale is being held in the MTSU Horticulture Center across Blue Raider Drive from the Tennessee Livestock Center. Hours for the sale Friday will be from 3 to 6 p.m., with prices ranging from $2.50 to $12.
“The students have been growing poinsettias through the fall semester,” Phillips said, adding that several hundred of the holiday plants remain for sale. “Take advantage of great prices on locally grown poinsettias while helping students in the Plant and Soil Science Club.”
Phillips said “delicious homemade fudge” also would be for sale.
Dates and times for the poinsettia sale for the week of Dec. 6-10 have yet to be set because Phillips does not know when the students will be available to work.
For more information, call 615-898-2523.

###
Media welcomed.

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree — the only one in Tennessee — as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

For MTSU news and information, go online to mtsunews.com.

[227] Campus Consultants Offer Leadership Training To Businesses

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Dec. 2, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Gina Logue, 615-898-5081

CAMPUS CONSULTANTS OFFER LEADERSHIP TRAINING TO BUSINESSES
MTSU Center Succeeds in County Government, Takes Program to Private Sector

(MURFREESBORO) - Sometimes a project works so well in the private sector that a governmental agency decides it’s worth copying and broadening. The MTSU Center for Organizational and Human Resource Effectiveness (COHRE) is doing the same thing in reverse. It is taking the Foundational Leadership Academy it created three years ago to help Rutherford County employees and offering it to private businesses and organizations.
The Foundational Leadership Academy conducts five half-day sessions once a month with county workers who have leadership potential. Up to 12 trainees and two primary trainers provide both individual attention and cover the issues business leaders constantly encounter.
Dr. Patrick McCarthy, director of COHRE, says the academy was designed to be practical, rigorous, hands-on and affordable, is quite adaptable to private sector circumstances and is applicable in both large and small businesses.
“It’s still about running a business,” notes McCarthy. “It’s still about managing people. It’s still about motivating. It’s still about dealing with conflict effectively and constructively.”
Rutherford County Mayor Ernest G. Burgess is a believer. He writes, “We recognize the value of developing our people, and COHRE has done a wonderful job adapting the training to the needs of each individual group. COHRE is a competent, energetic, resourceful and trustworthy organization.”
“While, on the one hand, we’re a stand-alone consulting firm of sorts, our affiliation with the university means a key part of our mission is to serve our community,” says McCarthy.
After three years of proven performance, the time seemed right to take the Foundational Leadership Academy to the Rutherford County business community. Dr. Michael Hein, associate director of COHRE, says a great many firms are discovering that they need to bolster their bench strength.
“What’s actually happening is the retirement of the Baby Boomers,” says Hein, ”and a lot of companies are realizing they’re going to have to move a lot of people up into positions to replace those people. And they don’t have the skills to do that.”
In the Foundation Leadership Academy, participants tackle specific scenarios within groups with each individual playing the roles of observer, feedback provider and feedback receiver at different times during the exercises. Ultimately, the entire group will discuss together their approaches to the scenarios.
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“We’ve had one person in the county with several years of business experience whose comment was this was the best training she’s ever received,” says Hein.
COHRE’s qualifications are found in its people—consultants with both peer-reviewed academic expertise and decades of real-world experience. Some of Hein’s former clients include Toshiba, Jack Daniel’s, Ingram Books and the Murfreesboro Police Department. Among McCarthy’s former clients are Proctor and Gamble, Union Carbide, State Farm, Pearl Drum Corporation and United Way.
To find out more about COHRE and the Foundational Leadership Academy, go to http://frank.mtsu.edu/~cohre/index.htm or call 615-217-2084.


--30--

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[226] MTSU Professor Explains Exchange Of Views With Medvedev

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Dec. 2, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Gina Logue, 615-898-5081, or WMOT-FM, 615-898-2800

MTSU PROFESSOR EXPLAINS EXCHANGE OF VIEWS WITH MEDVEDEV
Andrei Korobkov Describes Meeting with Russian Leader on ‘MTSU on the Record’
(MURFREESBORO) – An MTSU political science professor attended a conference in Moscow last month and wound up giving advice to Russian President Dimitry Medvedev for two hours. Dr. Andrei Korobkov will talk about his discussion with Medvedev on “MTSU on the Record” with host Gina Logue at 8 a.m. this Sunday, Dec. 5, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and wmot.org).
Korobkov encountered Medvedev at the fourth annual Assembly of the Russian World Foundation, which took place Nov. 2-4 in Moscow. The organization’s goal is to reestablish links with Russians all over the world. Medvedev solicited Korobkov’s perspective on how to entice more Russian intellectuals to return to their homeland.
In addition, Korobkov discussed politics with Russian World Foundation Executive Director Vyacheslav Nikonov, grandson of former Soviet Prime Minister Vyacheslav Molotov.
To listen to previous programs, go to http://www.mtsu.edu/news/podcast/podcast2010.shtml. For more information about “MTSU on the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

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With three Nobel Prize winners among its alumni and former faculty, Middle Tennessee State University confers master’s degrees in 10 areas, the Specialist in Education degree, the Doctor of Arts degree and the Doctor of Philosophy degree. MTSU is ranked among the top 100 public universities in the nation in the Forbes “America’s Best Colleges” 2009 survey.

Thursday, December 02, 2010

[225] Magazine Subscriptions Not Connected With MTSU

MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS NOT CONNECTED WITH MTSU
University Receiving Calls on Alleged Student ‘Salespeople’

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Dec. 1, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Tom Tozer, 615-898-2919

(MURFREESBORO)—Individuals claiming to be students selling magazine subscriptions door-to-door for MTSU are not affiliated with the university, officials said today.
“MTSU doesn’t have students going door-to-door selling things to benefit the university,” said Tom Tozer, director of MTSU’s Office of News and Public Affairs. “Fundraising for MTSU departments, scholarships and the like generally are handled by our Development Office, and anyone working with them will have the appropriate identification. You’ll probably also have heard some publicity about the fundraising event from our office, if it’s an appropriately university-sanctioned event.”
Concerned residents across the state contact MTSU from time to time to report questionable activities by people representing themselves as salespeople for MTSU, Tozer added.
One recent caller said a young man has been soliciting magazine subscriptions around Murfreesboro to fund Army ROTC scholarships at the university. The MTSU Military Science Department is not raising funds this way, officials said, and the name given by the alleged salesman is not valid.
“We simply encourage folks to trust their good sense and not fall victim to this kind of activity,” Tozer said. “We appreciate that our neighbors want to help our students, but the best way to do that is through our Development Office.”
Citizens approached by individuals claiming to be selling items to raise funds for MTSU can also report the activity to their local police departments.


Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.


For MTSU news and information, visit www.mtsunews.com.

—30—

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

[224] Dec. 1 Is Deadline for 2011-12 Academic Scholarships at MTSU

Release date: Nov. 30, 2010

News & Public Affairs contact: Randy Weiler, 615-898-5616 or jweiler@mtsu.edu

Dec. 1 Is Deadline for 2011-12 Academic Scholarships at MTSU

(MURFREESBORO) — Prospective MTSU students seeking academic scholarships for 2011-12 school year must submit all their information by the priority deadline of Wednesday, Dec. 1, university officials said.
Major scholarships include The Buchanan Fellowship; National Merit Achievement Finalist; and Chancellor, Presidential, Academic Service; Valedictorians and Salutatorians, Provost and the DREAM (Diverse Representation and Educational Access at MTSU) scholarships.
Students applying for Transfer Academic Scholarships have a Feb. 1, 2011, deadline for all application materials and transcripts to be on file. Potential awards include Phi Theta Kappa, TBR Community College Academic Service and Non-TBR Academic Service scholarships.
Other potential awards from the Office of Financial Aid include MTSU Foundation Scholarships (Feb. 15 deadline), Music Scholarships and Army Officer Scholarships (typically a Nov. 15 deadline). Students pursuing music must complete a separate scholarship and admission application form online, indicating Jan. 28, Feb. 19 or March 4 as the choice to audition.
Mailed applications that contain a Dec. 1 postmark will be accepted as meeting the priority deadline. Prospective students who apply between Dec. 2 and Feb. 15 may be considered if funding is available.
For more information, call MTSU Financial Aid at 615-898-2830 or visit mtsu.edu/financialaid online.

###

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

For MTSU news and information, go online to mtsunews.com.

Monday, November 29, 2010

[222] MTSU Professor Talks With Russian President In Moscow

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Nov. 29, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Gina Logue, 615-898-5081

MTSU PROFESSOR TALKS WITH RUSSIAN PRESIDENT IN MOSCOW
Dmitry Medvedev Seeks Insight on Bringing Russian Academics Home

(MURFREESBORO) - To get even 10 minutes worth of access to a major head of state is a gift which would make thousands of lobbyists giddy with anticipation. Dr. Andrei Korobkov, professor of political science, spoke with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev for two hours at a state reception and dinner at the Kremlin on Nov. 4.
Korobkov encountered Medvedev at the fourth annual Assembly of the Russian World Foundation, which took place Nov. 2-4 in Moscow.
“The organization is actively supported by President Medvedev, who is very interested in pushing it and considers it a way to reestablish links with the Russian diaspora abroad,” says Korobkov. “Increasingly, he is getting interested in bringing back Russian intellectuals who left.”
Medvedev has poured a great deal of his political capital into the Skolkovo Project, an attempt at a Russian Silicon Valley north of Moscow. He has obtained monetary contributions from Microsoft, Cisco and several Japanese companies.
“Huge amounts of money are being invested there, but, for now, their attempts to bring large numbers of Russian academics are in vain, basically,” says Korobkov. “I have been studying this problem for a long time, so I gave the main presentation at the conference.”
Korobkov says he emphasized to Medvedev that Russian intellectuals who have achieved tenure at universities in the West will not be inclined to return to their home country, especially given the degree of interaction with the Russian government they would be expected to endure.
“To imagine that in Russia it would be possible to leave academics alone is very hard because it’s an extremely bureaucratized country, and it became more bureaucratized than it was under the Soviet regime, ironically,” says Korobkov.
Therefore, Korobkov says he suggested to Medvedev that incentives be provided to lure these Russian academics back for short periods of time so they could give top-flight graduate students crash courses that would set them on the path toward becoming the country’s new “brain gain.”
On a personal level, Korobkov says Medvedev operates as a person accustomed to having power and not shy to show it.
“He is not used to people disagreeing with him,” says Korobkov.” And a couple of times he was kind of sharply angrily asking me, ‘So what, you disagree with me?’”

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RUSSIA
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Korobkov also talked politics with Vyacheslav Nikonov, the Russian World Foundation executive director, who has been a Kremlin insider for some 20 years and an adviser to both Medvedev and Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. Nikonov is the grandson of Vyacheslav Molotov, former Soviet Prime Minister and then Foreign Minister under Joseph Stalin after Stalin assumed the title of Prime Minister.
“He is a kind of shadow operator who has access to the highest echelons of power,” says Korobkov. ”Nikonov is very smart, very well educated, pretty calculating, a typical political consultant. If you look in the U.S., you can probably compare him to David Axelrod working for (President Barack) Obama or Karl Rove working for (President George W.) Bush.”
Prior to attending the Russian World Federation conference, Korobkov participated in an intense three-day gathering Oct. 27-30 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, sponsored by the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies.
Members of parliaments, committee chairs, representatives of international organizations and the European Union, as well as academics, discussed security and stability in Central Asia and Mongolia. Korobkov says the countries of this region face great challenges due to a water shortage and governments that are either openly authoritarian or lean in that direction.
However, some of these countries, which include the former Soviet republics of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan, are rich in important substances, including plutonium, platinum, oil and natural gas.
“There is a huge flow of migrants from those countries to Russia and from Russia to other parts of the world,” says Korobkov. “Second, this region is becoming increasingly the traffic route for drugs from Afghanistan.”
However, Korobkov says it would be unlikely that these countries would be invited to join NATO or the European Union as a way of protecting them from totalitarian takeovers.
“After the Georgian-Russian War, it became very dangerous to expand NATO because, in NATO, an attack against any member is an attack against every member,” says Korobkov.

--30--
ATTENTION, MEDIA: For photos of Dr. Andrei Korobkov in Germany and Russia, contact Gina Logue in the MTSU Office of News and Public Affairs at 615-898-5081 or gklogue@mtsu.edu.

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

[221] MTSU Clarinet Choir Plans Fun, Free Christmas Concert Dec. 1

MTSU CLARINET CHOIR PLANS FUN, FREE CHRISTMAS CONCERT DEC. 1
Holiday Favorites, Special Appearance by ‘Santa and His Gang’ Slated

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Nov. 29, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Tim Musselman, 615-898-2493

(MURFREESBORO)—The MTSU Clarinet Choir has planned a free, fun-filled Christmas concert at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 1, in Hinton Hall of the Wright Music Building on the MTSU campus.
“The Clarinet Choir and students from the MTSU Theatre Department will present ‘A Clarinet Christmas,’ featuring favorite holiday tunes, with an appearance by Santa and his gang,” said Dr. Todd Waldecker, professor of clarinet and director of the group.
The Clarinet Choir will perform “Dance of the Shepherds,” “Eine Kleine Nachtmusik,” “Deck the Halls,” “Up on the Rooftop,” “Carol of the Bells,” “Still, Still, Still,” “Trepak” from “The Nutcracker,” “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” and “A Christmas Festival.”
For more information on this free public concert and other performances at the MTSU School of Music, please call 615-898-2493 or visit the “Concert Calendar” link at www.mtsumusic.com.


Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

-------

IN BRIEF: The MTSU Clarinet Choir has planned a free, fun-filled Christmas concert at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 1, in Hinton Hall of the Wright Music Building on the MTSU campus. “The Clarinet Choir and students from the MTSU Theatre Department will present ‘A Clarinet Christmas,’ featuring favorite holiday tunes, with an appearance by Santa and his gang,” said Dr. Todd Waldecker, professor of clarinet and director of the group. For more information on this free public concert and other performances at the MTSU School of Music, please call 615-898-2493 or visit the “Concert Calendar” link at www.mtsumusic.com.

For MTSU news and information, visit www.mtsunews.com.

—30—

[220] MTSU Professors Return To The 'Dark Side' For Dec. 3 Performance

MTSU PROFESSORS RETURN TO THE ‘DARK SIDE’ FOR DEC. 3 PERFORMANCE
Tribute Band to Perform Pink Floyd Classics at The Blue Rooster

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Nov. 29, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Steve Holeman, steve@steveholeman.com or 615-995-6013

(MURFREESBORO)—The Pink Floyd tribute band Us & Them return to The Blue Rooster on Murfreesboro’s Public Square on Friday, Dec. 3, to perform the best-selling album “Dark Side of the Moon” and other Pink Floyd classics.

Cost for the event, which begins at 9:15 p.m., is $9 per person, and a portion of the proceeds will benefit scholarships for MTSU’s Recording Industry Program. Us & Them’s debut earlier this fall at a benefit performance for Autism Speaks netted almost $2,000 from a packed house and seeded a subsequent event that raised more than $100,000 for the charity.

Us & Them includes MTSU recording-industry professors Bill Crabtree, Cosette Collier and Dale Brown and Computer Information Systems professor Amy Hennington as part of a 10-piece band. Us & Them also features Steve Holeman, John Nichols, Tinnin Martin, Stacey Lee and Candace Warner. The talented group has taken on the task of performing the rock classic album as close to the original recording as possible—“from the first heartbeat to the last,” Brown said.

The idea to perform “Dark Side of the Moon,” Pink Floyd’s most commercially successful album, arose during rehearsals for a cover band called 2nd & Vine. That group includes several Us & Them members and is scheduled to perform until midnight following the Us & Them show.

“Dark Side of the Moon,” which has sold more than 15 million copies in the United States alone, spawned two singles, “Money” and “Us and Them.”

For more information about the show, including reserved seating, contact Holeman at 615-995-6013 or Steve@SteveHoleman.com before Wednesday, Dec. 1.
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IN BRIEF: The Pink Floyd tribute band Us & Them return to The Blue Rooster on Murfreesboro’s Public Square on Friday, Dec. 3, to perform the best-selling album “Dark Side of the Moon” and other Pink Floyd classics. Cost for the event, which begins at 9:15 p.m., is $9 per person, and a portion of the proceeds will benefit scholarships for MTSU’s Recording Industry Program. Us & Them includes MTSU recording-industry professors Bill Crabtree, Cosette Collier and Dale Brown and Computer Information Systems professor Amy Hennington as part of a 10-piece band. For more information, contact Steve Holeman at 615-995-6013 or Steve@SteveHoleman.com.


For MTSU news and information, visit www.mtsunews.com.


NOTE: Media needing a color JPEG of the Us & Them benefit performance poster or a B&W JPEG of Us & Them in performance should contact the Office of News and Public Affairs via e-mail at gfann@mtsu.edu or by calling 615-898-5385. Thanks!

[219] Aviation Trends in China Guide New Conference

Release date: Nov. 29, 2010

News & Public Affairs contacts: Randy Weiler, 615-898-5616 or jweiler@mtsu.edu
and Tom Tozer, 615-898-2919 or ttozer@mtsu.edu

Aviation Trends in China Guide New Conference
MTSU Aerospace Department Hosts Dec. 1-2 Event at Airport’s McDonald Hangar

(MURFREESBORO) — MTSU’s Aerospace Department will serve as host for the first National Conference on General Aviation Trends in China, set for Dec. 1-2 in the Donald McDonald Hangar inside the university’s Flight Operations Center at Murfreesboro Airport.
“We’re extremely excited about this conference, as it is one of the first in the United States that will have members of one of the largest universities in China here to learn about U.S. general aviation,” said Aerospace Chair Wayne Dornan.
“We have a distinguished list of U.S. speakers that will lend their expertise to the Chinese officials,” Dornan added. “… I am unaware of any such gathering that has taken place in the United States where high-ranking officials from both countries interact on aviation.”
The first day’s activities will include:
• welcoming remarks by MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee;
• a conference overview from Mike Vaughn, president of Corporate Flight Management-China and director of government services for Smyrna-based Corporate Flight Management;
• a discussion on general aviation in the United States, provided by Craig Spence, vice president for operations and international affairs for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association;
• news about aviation in China, from Dr. Sun XinQuang, vice dean of the Beihang University Law School;
• a panel discussion on general aviation in China and the United States; and
• an update from Dean Fulmer, National Special Activity Airspace project manager for the Federal Aviation Administration.
Following lunch, Mark Libby, head of collaborative decision-making at the FAA’s Air Traffic Control System Command Center, will lead a session on airspace management and air traffic control. Qiao Xin Shan, director of China’s air traffic control system, will speak on airspace management and air traffic control in that nation, and a discussion on similarities and differences in air traffic control in the nations will close the session before the group tours the MTSU ATC labs in the Business and Aerospace Building.
The group later will have dinner at Corporate Flight Management in Smyrna.
Thursday’s morning session will begin with a talk on regional airline operations in the United States from Charles “Chuck” Howell, CEO of Great Lakes Aviation Ltd., and will be followed by:
• a discussion on regional airline development in China, led by Geng Xue Song, vice president of operations and chief mechanic with China Flying Dragon General Aviation Co. Ltd.;
• a review of fixed-base operations and the role of the charter airlines, led by Allen Howell of Corporate Flight Management;
• a manufacturers’ panel discussion on general aviation business trends; and
• closing remarks from Beihang University’s Sun.
After lunch, the group will tour Smyrna Airport’s aviation facilities, followed by a Corporate Flight Management-sponsored reception.
The conference is closed to the general public.

###

Media welcomed.

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree — the only one in Tennessee — as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.

For MTSU news and information, go online to mtsunews.com.

In Brief

MTSU’s Aerospace Department will serve as host for the first National Conference on General Aviation Trends in China, set for Dec. 1-2 in the Donald McDonald Hangar inside the university’s Flight Operations Center at Murfreesboro Airport. Officials and experts will discuss topics ranging from general aviation in China and the United States, airspace management and air traffic control, Next Gen ATC, regional airline operations in the U.S., regional airline development in China, a review of fixed-base operations and the role of charter airlines, business trends and more.

[217] MTSU's 'Project Cuba' Revives Study-Abroad Effort After 6-Year Hiatus

MTSU’S ‘PROJECT CUBA’ REVIVES STUDY-ABROAD EFFORT AFTER 6-YEAR HIATUS
‘No Excuse for Being Ignorant’ about Caribbean Neighbor, Professor Says

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Nov. 24, 2010
EDITORIAL CONTACT: Dr. Ric Morris, 615-898-2284, rmorris@mtsu.edu

(MURFREESBORO)— After a six-year hiatus due to stringent U.S. government controls on travel to Cuba by American citizens, MTSU’s Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures has revived its successful Cuba study-abroad program for summer 2011.
The new program, called “Project Cuba,” has been retooled to fit new laws and is one of only a few such programs in existence nationwide.
“It’s a shame to wait out political changes that might never come,” said Dr. Ric Morris, professor of Spanish and linguistics at MTSU, who is serving as program director. “There has never been greater urgency for Americans to get behind the Iron Curtain and see for themselves what Cuba is all about.”
Because of the trade embargo, visiting Cuba without U.S. government permission can incur fines in the hundreds of thousands of dollars and up to 10 years in prison. As a result, very few Americans go there. The 2011 Cuba program is covered under an academic license, however, and is 100 percent legal for all qualifying participants.
The program will be open to three classifications of participants: undergraduate students, graduate students and faculty. All three groups will depart Nashville together on May 20, 2011, but will return at different times. Faculty and graduate students will stay two weeks and return on June 3. Undergraduates will stay 10 weeks and return on July 31.
“The undergraduate program is longer because U.S. law requires undergraduate study in Cuba to be at least 10 continuous weeks, no exceptions,” Morris explains. “Graduate study falls under the category of research and is not durationally restricted.”
While in Cuba, undergraduates will earn nine hours of Spanish credit taking language classes at the University of Havana. They also will take a custom-designed course, “Anthropological History of the Cuban People,” to be taught in English at the MontanĂ© Anthropological Museum in Havana. On return to MTSU, the course may be equated to three hours of credit either in ANTH 3710, Special Topics in Anthropology, or GS 3010, Global Studies: Study Abroad.
Graduate students and faculty will conduct independent-research projects. As much as possible, they will work in the field with research assistants, who will also help break down any cultural or language barriers encountered along the way.
For the duration of the visit, all three groups will reside in Havana in comfortable guest- house lodging. They will take meals together and enjoy cultural activities and excursions as a group.
“The only difference will be what each person does during working hours,” Morris says “Undergraduates will be taking classes, while the faculty and grad students are working on their research.”
All three prongs of the program are open to participants in any academic field and with any level of Spanish ability.
So why visit Cuba? Morris explains that much of what we hear about Cuba in the United States today is highly politicized, leading to grossly inaccurate perceptions of what Cuba is really like.
“We have no excuse for being ignorant about Cuba,” he says. “Cuba is closer to our borders than Chattanooga is to Murfreesboro, but what do we really know about Cuba besides the fact that it’s Marxist and exports cigars? How many Americans know, for example, that Cuba has virtually eradicated several lethal diseases that still kill thousands of Americans each year?”
Morris points out that past trip participants typically come away deeply challenged by the experience of being in Cuba even for just a few weeks.
“A lot of what you’ve believed about Cuba turns out to be correct, but even more turns out to be wrong,” he says.
“Cuba is the final frontier,” Morris adds. “After graduating college, most Americans will never have the opportunity to visit Cuba again legally. If Cuba intrigues you, there won’t be a better time to go than now.”
Morris has been to Cuba five times: four as an educational-program director and once on a humanitarian mission.
For more information about Project Cuba, interested students and faculty should contact Morris as soon as possible at 615-898-2284 or rmorris@mtsu.edu.

Founded in 1911, Middle Tennessee State University is a Tennessee Board of Regents institution located in Murfreesboro and is the state’s largest public undergraduate institution. MTSU now boasts one of the nation’s first master’s degree programs in horse science, and the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, D.C., acclaims MTSU’s Master of Science in Professional Science degree—the only one in Tennessee—as a model program. This fall, MTSU unveiled three new doctoral degrees in the sciences.
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IN BRIEF: MTSU is reviving its successful study-abroad excursion to Cuba for summer 2011 after a six-year hiatus caused by government travel restrictions. Dr. Ric Morris, professor of Spanish and linguistics at MTSU and program director of the new “Project Cuba,” says students and faculty should sign up now and not “wait out political changes that might never come. There has never been greater urgency for Americans to get behind the Iron Curtain and see for themselves what Cuba is all about.” The trip is open to undergraduates, graduate students and faculty, and they’ll depart May 20, 2011 for stays ranging from two to 10 weeks. For more information about Project Cuba, interested students and faculty should contact Morris at 615-898-2284 or rmorris@mtsu.edu.

For MTSU news and information, visit www.mtsunews.com.

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ATTENTION, MEDIA: For a color JPEG of Dr. Morris or a PDF of the “Project Cuba” informational brochure, contact Gina E. Fann in the Office of News and Public Affairs via e-mail at gfann@mtsu.edu or by calling 615-898-5385. Thanks!